New Undergraduate ICSL Members

ICSL welcomes three new undergraduate interns for the Summer 2019.

  1. Abhinav Sundur joining us from Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (BITS Pilani).
  2. M. Reza Karimi, a 2nd year Computer Science student from the EECS department at York U.
  3. Petr Roganov, a 3rd year space engineering student from the ESSE department at York U.

Welcome All!

2020-01-13T00:51:18+00:00news|

Two IEEE TBioCAS Papers

Two of our papers were invited and accepted to be presented in a special issue of  IEEE TBioCAS featuring the best papers presented in IEEE ISCAS 2019:

T. Zhan*, S. Fatmi*, S. Guraya*, H. Kassiri, “A Resource-Optimized VLSI Implementation of a Patient-Specific Seizure Detection Algorithm on a Custom-Made 2.2 cm2 Wireless Device for Ambulatory Epilepsy Diagnostics”, IEEE transactions on biomedical circuits and systems (TBioCAS), 2019, Early Access.

A. Dabbaghian*, T. Yousefi*, S.Fatmi*, P. Shafia*, and Hossein Kassiri. “A 9.2-gram Fully-Flexible Wireless Ambulatory EEG Monitoring and Diagnostics Headband with Analog Motion Artifact Detection and Compensation.” IEEE transactions on biomedical circuits and systems (TBioCAS), 2019, Early Access.

The authors are all members of the ICSL.
2020-01-13T00:11:41+00:00news|

ICSL partners with Novela Neurotechnologies

Together with Novela Neurotechnologies, ICSL received an NSERC engage grant for the project “Development of a wireless 8-channel neural monitoring SoC (system on a chip) for integration on a fully-flexible implantable brain-machine interface”

Closed-loop Neuromodulation, which means stimulating the brain using electrical pulses upon detection of a neurological event, is a well-known method that has been proven to be effective in treatment/control of various neurological disorders. The efficacy of such a treatment option heavily depends on continuous monitoring of the brain along with real-time processing of the recorded data to yield an accurate detection. This requires a highly-miniaturized (ideally implantable) device that integrates the three functions of monitoring, signal
processing, and stimulation while operating fully wireless. In addition to the electronics, such a device must also integrate recording/stimulation electrodes on the same platform.

The awarded project will advance the development of implantable EEG acquisition systems by designing miniaturized electronics for EEG data collection, processing, and wireless transmission. Combined with specialized electrodes made from biocompatible materials, the overall solution will overcome the limitations of current instrumentation and allow for widespread use of long-term EEG, resulting in better diagnosis and management of neurological conditions and leading to improved patient outcomes.

2019-11-23T19:44:41+00:00news|

Zainab and Pooria won the Student Choice Award!

Pooria Shafia and Syyeda Zainab Fatmi, two of the ICSL undergraduate research assistants, presented their work in Lassonde School of Engineering summer research conference.

Their poster was titled “A Fully-Flexible 8-Channel Active-Electrode Wireless Wearable Device for Surface EEG Recording with Motion Artifact Removal”.

They competed with more than 60 other projects and received the “Students’ Choice Award”. Congrats Pooria and Zainab!

2019-11-23T19:45:03+00:00award, news|

Sam won a presentation award

Sam Guraya, an ICSL undergraduate research assistant, presented his work in Lassonde School of Engineering summer research conference.

His Presentation was titled “Machine Learning Approaches for Seizure Detection using Frontal Scalp Electrode Recordings, Spectral Energy Bands, Phase Synchrony and Electrode Position based Feature Extraction”.

His work was selected as one of the only 5  out of ~70 projects to be presented as a talk, and he won the 2nd best presentation award. Congrats Sam!

2019-11-23T19:45:31+00:00award, news|

ICSL partners with Panaxium Inc.

Together with Panaxium, ICSL received an NSERC engage grant for the project “Development and Characterization of an implantable system-on-a-chip for long-term ambulatory EEG monitoring.”

The measurement and recording of electrical signals from the brain are known as electroencephalography (EEG). EEG is commonly used as part of the diagnosis and treatment planning for numerous neurological conditions including epilepsy, sleep disorders, brain injury, and others. This project was built to advance the development of implantable and wearable EEG acquisition systems by designing miniaturized electronics for EEG data collection, storage, and transmission.

The problem with current EEG instrumentation is that patients must either be tethered to the recording hardware by wired electrodes or wear a bulky headset to store and transmit the EEG data while powering the system. In either case, it is not possible to obtain high-quality EEG data over long periods of time, while the patient goes about their routine and daily activities. As a result, physicians commonly make clinical decisions based on inadequate and incomplete EEG information or, in clinical workflows for many neurological conditions, without any EEG information at all.

Combined with specialized electrodes made from highly biocompatible and durable organic electronic materials, our overall solution will overcome the limitations of current instrumentation and allow for widespread use of long-term EEG, resulting in better diagnosis and management of neurological conditions and leading to improved patient outcomes.

2020-01-20T16:56:29+00:00news|